Litigation

What Is The Difference Between Litigating And What Barristers Normally Do?

Barristers Wig & Gown - ShenSmith BarristersWhen the Bar’s public direct access scheme first appeared, it was designed to enable lay clients who could manage their case without the assistance of a solicitor to instruct a barrister directly. It was not intended to let barristers perform the role of solicitors. Barristers were prohibited from “conducting litigation”, which included going on the court record as acting for a client and being the court’s and opposition solicitors’ point of contact for the client. Since 2014, however, barristers who attain the right to act in a “dual capacity” may carry out the functions of a solicitor as as well as a barrister (subject to the rule that barristers may still not hold client money on account). This means that clients can now enjoy a legal “one stop shop” – something which has traditionally been available only in other jurisdictions, such as the USA – for a more streamlined and responsive service.

Does This Mean I Have To Pay The Barrister To Do Everything A Solicitor Would Do, On Top Of The Barrister Work?

Instructing a barrister in a dual capacity does not mean that you have to instruct them to do everything. It is open to the client to continue to do things such as filing documents at court themselves. The scope of the barrister’s work is defined in a client care letter – just as it would be under a normal direct access instruction – so you can be flexible in what responsibilities you want them to take on. You can feel your way as you go, increasing or decreasing the barrister’s responsibilities according to how you get on with managing your case, or leave everything in their hands for a period, because you are going on holiday or have another commitment which requires your attention, then go back on the court record as acting for yourself. If you want a barrister to go on the court record as acting for you, it is likely that they will require an up front contingency payment to cover any work which they may be required (but not specifically instructed) to do as a consequence of being on the court record, though any balance will be refundable at the end of the barrister’s period of instruction.

What Advantages Does The “One Stop Shop” Model Have Over Using A Barrister And A Solicitor?

One stop shop litigationBy instructing a barrister in a dual capacity, you will effectively be instructing a solicitor in sole practice who has specialist training and experience in the barrister’s traditional functions: advice; drafting; and advocacy. This means that, every time any of those three services is required, time and money will be saved, as there will be no need for a solicitor to draft instructions to the barrister and wait for them to read those instructions (and and accompanying documents) and revert. Similarly, if the barrister needs more information from you, they can just ask directly, speeding things up and saving costs.